The Power of Paying Attention

The Power of Paying Attention

Group 3: Christy Hamrick, Phylicia Jeffreys, Rebecca Kavel, Kelly Monka

Directions:

  1. Listen to the following podcast (Click on link above).
  2. Post a reaction to the podcast you just heard.
  3. Read the posts of peers.
  4. Offer response to your peers by making statements, asking questions, or making connections.
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Published in: on February 24, 2014 at 3:38 pm  Comments (10)  

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10 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. A couple of quotes stood out to me as I listened:
    “The world is made up of one detail after another” and ” Nothing is too small to ignore” Both of these quotes remind me of my day to day duties in school and my work with students. I, myself, can be hyper aware of everything (all little details) or fairly tuned out to details depending upon the day of the week or the time of day! So I am not sure how much is inherent and/or environmental.

    • I can relate to feeling tuned out at times. I have been in class before and realized a student was absent from the room and asked where the were, and another student reply you told them they could go to the bathroom. That is a little frightening! I think that is environmental and stress related! 🙂

    • During school and work I feel the same way. There are days that I’m aware of all the details and there are other days that something slips by me and I think, “How did I not notice that?” The day of the week or the time of the day could definitely have something to do with it!

  2. Reblogged this on rebeccakavel and commented:
    A couple of quotes stood out to me as I listened:
    “The world is made up of one detail after another” and ” Nothing is too small to ignore” Both of these quotes remind me of my day to day duties in school and my work with students. I, myself, can be hyper aware of everything (all little details) or fairly tuned out to details depending upon the day of the week or the time of day! So I am not sure how much is inherent and/or environmental.

  3. My first thought as the podcast began, was that I don’t pay attention to details as much as I should, and I asked myself what I might be missing. As it continued I realized I do notice the details in the people around me. In their facial expressions, how they exhibit different moods, and interact with me and others. I can see a family member, colleague, students, or even a stranger, and if I take the time to really look at them I can read their emotions. I think it is important as a person in general to pay attention to the details, to actively be a prat of one another’s lives. I love how he ended, “…I can see the world much more clearly, much more broadly. By zeroing in, I learn to expand.” If we are all only consumed with the big picture we can miss many opportunities and experiences with each other.

    • Reading emotions is really important. I just mentioned this to a friend the other day that I think sometimes in all this world of technology the world of social cues and being able to read body language might be something that is eventually lost.

  4. This podcast was interesting to me because I always feel appreciated if someone pays attention to something I do or something that has changed about me. I’m not as observant as the author, but I do notice things about the people in my life and always try to ask them about themselves. I think it makes people feel appreciated if you remember things about them and ask about it.

    One of my friends is really observant. He asked me after Christmas if I was wearing a new shirt and got a new necklace. (Which I had) He also poured me a glass of white wine because he said he remembered me saying I didn’t really like red. When I asked him about it he said he’s always been observant and it’s important to him to make others realize he cares.

    As teachers being observant to not only what our students are accomplishing in school but to how they are acting and how certain things affect them is important too.

    • Students learn better from those they trust. We gain their trust by noticing the details and noticing how to respond to the details of their life. When we pay attention to the details of our students we can make what we are teaching relevant and personal. We can see where they are and meet them there. If we pay attention to the details of our students we will have a better understating of how to assist them in their learning journey.

  5. This reminds me of Trifles, by Susan Glaspell. It’s one of my favorite screenplays! I’ve only read it, and it points to the necessity of paying attention to detail. It’s a murder mystery. The murder seems to suggest one story but the details, the smallest details tell an astonishing truth. I too believe it is important to pay attention to detail.

  6. I agree that being observant shows that you care!


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